Tag Archives: artist

From the Studio of K. Nari

Meet one of Third and Wall’s newest artists, Nari! Originally from Seoul, Korea, Nari moved to Los Angeles with her family when she was eleven years-old.  With a naturally creative talent, she studied fine art throughout her childhood and into college.  Her career as an artist has taken her from editorial illustrations for magazines and publishing & record companies to becoming an independent artist, currently.  The subject matters Nari enjoys most are florals, abstract, transitional, and landscapes, but she also enjoys exploring a variety of other subject matter. Textile design, fashion and interior design are the primary inspiration for her artwork.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

I make my parlettes and make sure the canvases are prepped and ready to go.

How many paintings do you work on at a time?

Usually two to three.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

“Iridescence Peak”

I’d like to paint large-scale murals

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? 

I would paint with Michael Bond. I would like to see and learn his painting techniques.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

I look through interior design and fashion magazines and sites.

How has your art evolved over time?

With an illustration background, I used to do a lot of portrait painting. Now I love painting floral, abstract, and transitional art.

What do you like most about your work?

The movements and layers of paints.

What is one word that best describes your style?

Modern

Is there an idea you would like to explore? 

“Rolling Hill”

I would love to explore textile design.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Mid morning and late evening

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?

Yes! I walk away and work on something else until I figure it out.

What is up next on your easel?

I am recreating an abstract painting on canvas, which was originally done on paper in a smaller size.

 

All of these images by K. Nari (and more!) are available in our Print-On-Demand collection.  Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Studio of Linda Stelling

We have another artist to share with you!  Growing up in an artistically-rich family of painters, craftsmen, musicians, and floral colorists, Linda Stelling was bound for the art world.  Her art career has taken her many different places, and now she is continuing the work she began as an abstract expressionist many years ago. She is fueled by her interest in color and the dream studies she has been exposed to for so long. Linda is in the studio every day, and when she’s not, she is planning and studying for the next artwork.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

Stretch! I stand all day so it’s important to me to maintain flexibility. 

White Clouds Blue Sky

How many paintings do you work on at a time? 

It depends. Sometimes I concentrate on only one, especially if it’s really big, but frequently I have several going at a time.  If something stays in the studio unfinished too long, I tend to change it.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

Yes, to be given the opportunity to create for a really large space. I like my work to have ample room to breathe.  A nice large, open museum would work.

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? 

Monet for sure. He and I have many of the same artistic principles and very much the same vision.  We share a similar color palette, subject matter, philosophies and family values.  He and I share a love of gardening and of a simple beautiful flower.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

I am always looking and thinking how my internal experiences can meld with my external creativity and perceptions.  I often take my dreams and use part or all of the memory to form the beginnings of an idea for a painting.  I try to parley the connection of our mental health, to our creative selves; which I feel we all experience on some level.

LA Pink Flower

How has your art evolved over time? 

For many years, I painted on a commission basis, which proved to be an incredible training ground.  I was able to work quickly and produce just about anything.  When I stopped, I was temporarily lost.  It was only when I began listening to myself and not caring what anyone else thought, that I began to be truly satisfied with my own work.

What do you like most about your work?

My work has so much energy and life. I am a colorist by nature and I enjoy making the color move to what has been described as a “Psychic Vibration.”

What is one word that best describes your style? 

Expressive.

Is there an idea you would like to explore? 

Ethereal Discourse

Anything curvilinear delights me!

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Morning and afternoon – until I loose the light.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do? 

Turn it upside down!

What is up next on your easel?

I’m developing an abstract series based on Monet and his gardens at Giverney.

Linda’s work is available in our Print-On-Demand collection.  Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Studio of Dina D’Argo

Dina D’Argo

Let us introduce you to one of our newer artists, Dina D’Argo!  Originally from San Diego, Dina now lives near Nashville and enjoys life with her horses and dogs when she is not in the studio. With bold brush strokes, lush colors, and textural elements, Dina D’Argo captures the grace and beauty of her subjects. An animal lover and horsewoman, her focus is on celebrating the bond between ourselves and nature.  Dina works mainly in acrylic on canvas, with a refined yet dramatic blend of abstract and representational styles.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

My studio is on the rural property where I live. I like to have my animals around me when I work, so I let the dogs in, get their beds situated near the windows where they like them, and I bring my 2 horses in from the pasture so I can easily see them grazing and relaxing in the yard.

How many paintings do you work on at a time? 

Coastline II

I use many layers of color and also a number or texture products. I usually have one piece that I am really concentrating on, but possibly 2 or three more either in “prep” or “finishing touches” stages.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on? 

Yes; My husband (who is a writer) and I are planning to collaborate at some point to create a book of equine stories and artwork inspired by mythology from different cultures.

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? 

I prefer to paint alone, but I would love to walk in the desert finding old bones and sticks with Georgia O’Keefe.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

Connecting with nature; just looking at the sky or the relationships of color, shape, and light found on our beautiful planet.

How has your art evolved over time? 

Winter Birds and Branches

Over time, my work continues to become less defined and more intuitive. Simplification has become appealing to me, and I am compelled to “pare down” the subjects in my images yet still retain a sense of complexity in the overall composition.

What do you like most about your work?

To me, my paintings are simple on the surface, but have a strong sense of emotion to them.

I think I paint “feelings” more than images, and I love that people can connect in a powerful way and feel inspired or understood by one of my pieces.

What is one word that best describes your style?

Organic

Integrity

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

I would like to explore simplifying the landscape down to just the bare minimum of color and line, while still capturing the essence of the subject and the emotional connection to it.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Afternoon into evening is my favorite time to paint, as I have a beautiful view of the sunset out over the horse pastures. But any unfettered studio time is precious.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?

This is a big challenge for me! I have found that rather than trying to force myself when “stuck”, the resolution will often come if I just relax and let it happen spontaneously. I am working on being more forgiving and flexible with myself, and allowing myself to put a piece aside if it isn’t flowing easily. But I haven’t gotten there yet 😉

Last Day of Summer

What is up next on your easel?

Two very different things are “in the works”: One is the second in a series of loose landscapes focusing on a brilliant sun, as in my “Last Day Of Summer” piece. The other is a figurative piece I was asked to create for our community on the Tennessee/Kentucky border to celebrate the solar eclipse.

 

All of these images by Dina, and more, are available in our Print-On-Demand Collection.  Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Studio of Julie Devine

We have been so busy at Third and Wall that we haven’t had a chance to update our blog in a while.  But we are back and excited to introduce one of our artists to you!

Julie Devine

Meet Julie Devine!  Although originally from California, Julie has lived in the Pacific Northwest since 1991.  Julie paints from the landscape, combining gestural brushwork and knifework into a distinctive, semi-abstract style.  With a detailed eye for composition and light, she captures the spirit of the landscape she paints.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

I open the window, turn on the fan, and make some tea. Then I select my music. Billie Holiday is a favorite, especially on rainy days in Seattle. Or a collection of women jazz vocalists. 

How many paintings do you work on at a time?

I like to focus on a single work at a time, but there are times when I’ll have two or three paintings going.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

I’d like to paint something enormous that is luminous and inspiring. An abstract landscape that is life size—one you feel you could walk into. And I’d like it to live in a public space where many

Green Carpet

people could experience it. 

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? 

Oh, that is a good question! There are so many artists I’d love to paint with. If I had to choose a living painter, my first thought is Eric Aho. He paints these amazingly gestural, bold landscapes that bridge traditional and contemporary art. If I could paint with an artist who has passed, I might choose to paint in plein air with Van Gogh. I adore his tree landscapes and his aim to paint the life energy of his subjects. Louisa McElwain would be another contender. She painted Southwest canyon vistas on giant canvases in plein air with a speed and confidence that is astounding. 

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

Smoke & Fire

Recently I’ve been paying a lot of attention to composition. When I see something in nature that interests me, I photograph it, then work with the photograph online or in sketches. I also like to look at master works and determine why they work so well. I read this excellent book a couple of years ago – Composition of Outdoor Painting by Edgar Payne. He demonstrates several successful strategies for arranging objects in a landscape. I think about these a lot as I’m planning a painting. If the composition isn’t strong, why bother creating the work! 

How has your art evolved over time?

I trained at Gage Academy of Art and started with an academic approach to painting. I paid close attention to achieving a likeness of my subject, creating a sense of depth, light, and temperature. I painted carefully and focused on observation and color mixing. Gaining these skills takes time. Once I felt I had these under my belt, I experimented on my own. I travelled to Southern California and New Mexico and saw work inspired by Russian impressionism. The paint was bold and thick, the style was expressive, and yet the work remained true to the effects of light. I also spent time with Abstract Expressionist works. Joan Mitchell, Arshile Gorky, Lee Krasner, and Perle Fine are some of my favorite artists in this style. What I admired most about the art I saw was the confidence and bold use of paint. Over time, I have found my expressive style.

Majesty

What do you like most about your work?

I like the shapes in my work. I also like the confidence and the gestural quality of the paint handling. I like the subtle shifts in color temperature that create vibrancy.

What is one word that best describes your style?

I think of them as “spirited.” I hear “luminous” come up a lot from collectors and people who follow my work.

Someone once described my work as “spiritually kind.” I love that description! 

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

Yes, right now I’m exploring large rocky landscape formations.  I’d like to explore these on a very large scale.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Anytime is a good time. 

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?

Yes. It happens less often now that I spend a lot of time working out a composition before I begin to paint. But when I get stuck, I take a look at the work in a mirror. Sometimes seeing it backward will reveal problems in its composition. The mirrored image helps me see the image with fresh eyes. I’ve also been known to take it to my kids for their insight. They are very candid, and my older son has a good sense of design. He’ll say things like “this part looks good, but it’s messed up here.”  

What is up next on your easel?

A wolf portrait that’s being commissioned, and a semi-abstract, horizontal mountain landscape in a high color key.

Julie’s paintings live in international private collections and have been exhibited in the Pacific Northwest.  Seattle’s Group Health Hospital has acquired several pieces of her work for their permanent collection.

All of these pieces featured and more works by Julie Devine are available in our Print-On-Demand collection, and some of her originals are also available on our website.  Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

A Seattle visit from artist Lisa Ridgers!

Penny Alspeth, Lisa Ridgers and Aimee Clarke in the 3&W showroom

Penny Alspaugh, Lisa Ridgers and Aimee Clarke in the 3&W showroom

Recently we had the pleasure of hosting one of our most sought-after and prolific artists, Lisa Ridgers, along with her longtime partner and business manager Penny Alspaugh.

Lisa has been a Third & Wall artist for almost 10 years, but her home is in England, so this was the first opportunity she’s had to visit our showroom in the Emerald City. Since Lisa’s stateside visit was such a rare and beautiful thing for us, we made the most of it!

Lisa Ridgers

 

 

 

Although technically she was on vacation, we talked her into touching up some canvases. She was more than happy to jump in with her paintbrush and paints!

 

 

Lisa, Penny and Aimee reviewed all of the fantastic new Ridgers art that recently arrived from the UK. Lisa’s newest works are large and vibrant, with a range of inspiring color palettes that satisfy and transcend the wide and ever-changing range of interior decor trends. They include delicate figuratives, bright modern abstracts, and even traditional and transitional landscapes.

PennyLisaAimeeBrad

 

 

Lisa’s agent Brad Huff joined in on the fun as they toured the Third & Wall showroom and artwork.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then it was time for everyone to relax at a fun and casual lunch around our conference table. Those of the 3&W team that hadn’t met Lisa and Penny yet had a great time getting to know them.

Lisa Ridgers with some of the 3&W team

Lisa Ridgers with some of the 3&W team

A BIG thank you to Lisa and Penny for crossing the pond to come visit us and meet the team!

From The Studio of Jill Martin

jill martin studio_USEJill Martin’s ethereal imagery is bright and soft, glowing with clean hues and a dreamy appeal that few can resist.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

Check my email, read some news, then spend some time cleaning up my painting table which I always leave messy from the day before.

 How many paintings do you work on at a time?

I’ll prep several canvases at once, but I tend to focus on just one or two paintings at a time.

474018D8

Merriment II

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

To paint 5 or 6 large paintings of different types of couples.

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?

Very hard to choose. I could learn so much from Alex Kanevsky, Julie Heffernan, and Kent Williams.

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

How to paint the figure not in an impressionistic or gestural way but like a blurry photograph. – early Gerhard Richter’s work.

jillmartin landscapeptg_USEWhat is your favorite time of day to paint?

I’ll paint whenever, but the light in the studio is usually best midday and afternoon.

 Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?

Yes, I do get stuck sometimes and keep redoing areas over and over. At that point I have to not look at the painting for a few hours or a few days. Then when I go back to it I have a fresh perspective which hopefully makes it easier to see what needs to be done.

 What is up next on your easel?

A large abstracted landscape.

Jill Martin’s original works, posters, and print-on-demand imagery are available from Third & Wall Art Group. All images © Jill Martin and published/distributed by Third & Wall Art Group.

 

 

Featured Artist: Lisa Ridgers

Artist Lisa Ridgers

Artist Lisa Ridgers

We see the paintings and we know the artist’s name, but we don’t know anything else about the person who created the art, how she works, or how she is inspired. We recently caught up with Lisa Ridgers in her studio to find out from the top-selling artist herself – how does she create all those gorgeous paintings?

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

Usually I crank some tunes and jiggle around a little bit to get warmed up, inspired and loosen my muscles

How many paintings do you work on at a time?

It varies but normally two or three.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

Yes, I would LOOOOVE to work on a piece for P!NK. Sounds a bit weird, I know, but I really admire her talent and her authenticity, the lady rocks!

RidgersStudio2If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?

Well, if I had powers of resurrection, definitely JMW Turner. One more just to be greedy……I would also love to paint with Sarah Stockstill, her work has always inspired me.

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

Yes, I currently am intrigued by all the digital work that artists are now doing and would like to learn some new skills, incorporating something along those lines into my work.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Morning……my brain fritzes out in the afternoons.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?RidgersStudio

Yes, I sometimes used to fight pieces to the death but now I take a different approach. I turn them around and they face the wall until I am ready to work on that piece again…some sit for weeks at a time.

What is up next on your easel?

I am playing around with a new “urban” look but have to work out some kinks yet…should be a fun day 🙂

Lisa Ridger’s original works, posters and print-on-demand imagery are available from Third & Wall Art Group.

Summer Fun!

I’m so excited about these new images from Liz Jardine. Don’t they just scream summer!? I love the silhouetted rides against the woodgrain-inspired background. Dreaming of fun-filled days running from ride to ride, stopping for ice cream, elephant ears, and corn dogs along the way.

~ Aimee Clarke, Creative Director