Tag Archives: abstract art

From the Studio of Pablo Rojero

Artist Pablo Rojero’s work graces interiors all over the world, and it’s easy to see why. His captivating style is apparent whether he’s working on abstracts, cityscapes, landscapes or figuratives. Not only is Pablo an accomplished artist, he’s also a delightfully warm and open individual, an engaging conversationalist, and is dedicated to his family and his work. Versatile and energetic, he is always open to exploring new ideas and creative avenues.

Pablo Rojero

Pablo Rojero

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?
The first thing I do in the morning is take my twin sons to school. After that i usually have breakfast with my daughter.

How many images do you work on at a time?
I usually work on two to three; I lose focus if I put too many on the wall.

 

 

Rustic City

Rustic City

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?
My dream project would be to start an art program geared to help children with autism, as both my sons have autism.

If you could collaborate with anyone, who would it be?
I would have loved to paint with William Bouguereau, he was an amazing academic painter.

 

 

Pablo at work
What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?
I was taught by a mentor to look at my surroundings everywhere I go, to look at every detail, from texture on the street to how light affects objects. I constantly do this as it builds my repertoire of ideas.

How has your artwork evolved over time?
My art has become more free and balanced. I’ve learned when to stop and say “it’s done” as I used to overcook  the art.

What do you like most about your work?
I really like the layers on my art, I feel that it is a crucial process in my paintings. You’ve got to let the art breathe.

Del Mar, California

Del Mar, California

What is one word that best describes your style?
Spontaneous

Is there an idea you would like to explore?
I would like to explore figurative art a bit more.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?
I like 10:00 am. By then I’m fully recharged and ready to go.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?
I get stuck on pieces all the time, and when it happens I’ll just go back to something that worked in the past.
I sometimes play some guitar or hit the drums which shifts my thinking, it helps a lot.The artist's studio

What is up next on your easel?
I’m currently working on Neutral tone abstracts. I’m using silver and gold leaf as a new element in my work. I’m incorporating elements of texture that I observe in the environment, for example cement, the patina on antique furniture etc.

Pablo’s works are available for Print-On-Demand and licensing, and a selection of his images are available in our Original and Poster collections. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Studio of Kelsey Hochstatter

Unknown-5From graceful abstracts to haunting figuratives, whimsical children’s images to  transitional landscapes, Kelsey Hochstatter’s artwork claims both masculine and feminine appeal, making it ideal for (and very popular in) all interiors, whether corporate, residential, hospitality or healthcare. And her style is always uniquely Kelsey!

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?  Dive right in!

How many paintings do you work on at a time? Sometimes only one, sometimes a few. If I’m doing a series of panels, or small pieces that work as a group, I work on them together bouncing from one to another and progressing from sketching to painting to collage.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on? I would love to work on an extremely large-scale mixed-media piece. Something that takes at least a year to complete and requires scaffolding and my climbing gear to reach the top.

OHOC-247If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? Amongst others, I would love to paint with, and glean from, Anselm Kiefer.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration? There are so many ways. One of my favorites is walking through a vintage flea market with my husband, digging through memories, realizing nostalgia in entirely new ways. I gain a lot from this. My neighbor recently gave me piles of vintage ephemera for my studio. Every single piece had meaning. Someone had saved each item for some reason meaningful to them. I love having this stuff at my fingertips. I can give it new life; freeze it in time.UHOC-206

How has your art evolved over time? As a child I sketched often. When I started painting seriously in college I was focusing on painting and printmaking. My paintings were originally strictly paintings. Just paint. I started experimenting with mixed media around ’06. Still, more paint than not. Since then I’ve noticed more and more collage has come into my work. The work I’ve really planted roots in and am most passionate about involves sketching, painting and vintage ephemera collage. When I can exercise various techniques and create a piece that truly ‘works’ while doing so, I’m happy.

What do you like most about your work? The attempt at nostalgia.

UHOC-314What is one word that best describes your style?  Nostalgic.

Is there an idea you would like to explore? I am intrigued by how much texture could be used in order to gain more and more interest and depth while still maintaining 2-dimensionality.

What is your favorite time of day to paint? Late afternoon/ early evening. I’m a night owl who OHOC-222loves to paint until my eyes go blurry, but I find that I am most energized and in a groove during those hours.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do? Sometimes. When I’m stubborn and try to work through it I usually just prolong finding the answer. Stepping away often helps, but leaving the studio is hard. Asking my 3 year old son what he thinks can also shed some light on the situation. Toddlers have a nice way of seeing the world, and art.

 What is up next on your easel? A new series involving figures, layered numbers, and vintage ephemera.

Unknown

Kelsey’s intriguing images can be viewed in the Posters, Print-On-Demand and Originals sections of our website. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.