Category Archives: Feature Artists

From the Camera Lens of Melissa McClain

Melissa McClainThird & Wall is excited to introduce our newest photographer, Melissa McClain.

With a passion for color and creativity, Melissa is a fine art photographer who captures traditional subjects with a modern, abstract style. Melissa spent over 15 years working in Crisis Management providing Survivor and Family Assistance support around the world after mass casualty aviation accidents and terrorist attacks. Over the years, her self-care practice integrated photography and art journaling as tools to process her own career-related grief and trauma. Melissa’s creativity quickly evolved from self-care ritual to passion and continues to grow as a larger purpose to share color and creativity through art photography and creativity workshops. Her fine art photography collections have been shown in exhibitions and public art installations in New York City and Seattle.

Melissa was recently featured on GeekWire.com. We’re glad she’s our neighbor here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle!

How would you describe your photography style?



I consider myself primarily an Impressionist-style photographer. My photographs are full of colors, textures and shapes and are often mistaken for paintings because of their abstract nature. Impressionists aimed to capture the momentary, sensory effect of a scene – the impression objects made on the eye in a fleeting instant. My photos represent what I see when I look at the world around me, beyond the detail of a scene is a world of color and light. For me, it’s mixing the view through my eyes with the feelings in my soul.

 

What are your typical photography subjects?



I have four main photography collections in my portfolio.

Water Colors Collection. These are photos from the bottoms of boats. A non-traditional subject, I unexpectedly began this collection during a trip to Iceland. A random, upside down boat led to a photo experiment that resulted in a passion for searching boat yards for artful renderings. These abstract images are full of color and texture and look like abstract paintings.

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Modern Landscape and Coastal Collections are impressionist photography collections of landscapes and sunrises and sunsets on the water. The technique I use to create these images is done while taking the photo, not in post-processing.

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Water Painting Collection. These are images created during the golden hour when the light reflections paint the surface of water, creating colorful and abstract details waiting to be captured. These are some of my favorite images.

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Modern Nautical Collection focuses on boats and creating modern, abstract images of boats. From their hulls to capturing their various shapes floating on water in unexpected ways, I’ve been called a “boat whisperer.”

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Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?



MMC-0137I want to go to the Netherlands in the height of Spring tulip season and spend days in the tulip fields creating images for my Modern Landscape Collection.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

Water and my sketchbook.

My artistic expression comes out primarily as a photographer but about 6 years ago I enrolled in a Creativity Coach Certification program. In that program I discovered the value of what I like to call “creative cross training”. I have a sketchbook that is full of colorful oil pastel doodles – drawings of whimsical characters and abstract renderings. My time in my sketchbook is a workout for my creative thinking and visualizing skills and I see photo opportunities in the field better when I art journal regularly.

When I’m with my camera, inspiration comes most prominently from water. I have a soul connection with water and nothing calms me or inspires me more than being on and photographing the water.

How has your photography evolved over time?

MMC-0069-WaterPaintingMy photography has always had a common theme of colors and water/reflections. As a young adult carrying around a “point and shoot” camera taking tourist photos on business trips around the world, I can now see that this style was emerging. As I upgraded my equipment, learned how to use a professional camera and started to trust my internal guidance, that’s when the abstract collections began and my photography truly took on an artform.

What do you like most about your work?

It’s a bit non-traditional and always sparks conversation and inquiry. Often times viewers are uncertain of the subject and medium. Explaining what the subject actually is and how I captured it with my camera is always fun and I love watching customers bond with images after the discovery. I also love the individual stories and visions people find in abstractness of my photos. What do you see?

And, color. Always color. I have a very strong connection with color and color energy and I get a lot back from my photos when I look at them.

What is your favorite time of day to shoot?



MMC-0078-WaterPaintingLike most photographers, the golden hours are my favorite times to shoot. The light is perfect and because I love color and reflections and capturing those two together, the golden hour light is a true gift. Morning golden hour, when many are still asleep and the world is quiet and still has a most magical quality to it.

Melissa’s works are available on a variety of substrates in our Print-On-Demand collection. For more information about Third & Wall Art Group, visit our website, www.thirdandwall.com.

All images ©Melissa McClain.

 

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From the Studio of Jeff Iorillo

Jeff Iorillo is a Los Angeles-based painter working in acrylic and enamel on canvas, masonite, and metal.

Jeff’s ongoing process exploration leads to distinct bodies of work with a bold abstract approach that investigates materials, mass and momentum, color and gesture. He is interested in seizing the viewer’s attention with immediate impact, then holding it with a dynamic technique and details that invite speculation.

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“Burnt Orange Momentum”

Jeff has studied at the San Francisco Art Institute, and Otis College & Art Center in Los Angeles. His work is acquired by individuals and corporate collections from L.A. to Hong Kong to Mexico City, and is commissioned for commercial installations worldwide. He has been represented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Art Rental & Sales Gallery, and his work is regularly selected by Hollywood set designers for television and cinema.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?



I turn on the lights and check whatever I left to dry the night before. Sometimes I turn on NPR or my own music, but usually I like it quiet.

How many paintings do you work on at a time?



Usually 3 or 4.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?



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Blue & White Stained II

Something big, maybe over 8 x 8 feet. I do a lot of commissions for public spaces based on my own originals, up to sizes of around 6 x 9 feet, so going a lot larger than that would be both a logistical and artistic challenge.

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?



Some of the Action Painters of the 20th Century–like Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning. Both the techniques and the personalities would probably get pretty wild!

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?

I’m what’s known as a “process painter”, meaning it’s the actual process of moving the paint around that inspires my ideas. I’m always asking, “what happens if I do this” so each piece is a different answer. Much of my work is motivated by physical movements, with titles containing words like “Velocity” and “Momentum”. I am very aware of what my body and my breath are doing when I paint. The movement really motivates everything.

How has your art evolved over time?

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Whispers

I’d say my work has become more subtle in terms of composition and color as I’ve developed my techniques and learned more about mixing colors and creating more nuanced palettes for each piece.

What do you like most about your work?

My favorite pieces have a strong presence that feels confident and authentic.

What is one word that best describes your style?

“impact”

Is there an idea you would like to explore?



UIOR-183-T1ITFUJE

Pink Velocity

I am constantly developing new ideas, like every day…I like working out a new direction by doing multiples, starting simple and getting progressively more complex and larger in size.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?



First thing in the morning. I’m an early riser, usually in the studio by 7 or 8 a.m.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?



This sounds terrible, but I destroy things that aren’t working. At some point I can tell when a piece isn’t coming together and the result will be awkward and forced–so it’s better to get rid of it and start over. Kind of cathartic, actually!

What is up next on your easel?



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Copper Gyre

A recent experiment involved building up multiple thick layers of transparent colors on top of each other, very wet and runny-feeling; I have some larger stretched canvases leaning against a wall, calling my name…

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A Seattle visit from artist Lisa Ridgers!

Penny Alspeth, Lisa Ridgers and Aimee Clarke in the 3&W showroom

Penny Alspaugh, Lisa Ridgers and Aimee Clarke in the 3&W showroom

Recently we had the pleasure of hosting one of our most sought-after and prolific artists, Lisa Ridgers, along with her longtime partner and business manager Penny Alspaugh.

Lisa has been a Third & Wall artist for almost 10 years, but her home is in England, so this was the first opportunity she’s had to visit our showroom in the Emerald City. Since Lisa’s stateside visit was such a rare and beautiful thing for us, we made the most of it!

Lisa Ridgers

 

 

 

Although technically she was on vacation, we talked her into touching up some canvases. She was more than happy to jump in with her paintbrush and paints!

 

 

Lisa, Penny and Aimee reviewed all of the fantastic new Ridgers art that recently arrived from the UK. Lisa’s newest works are large and vibrant, with a range of inspiring color palettes that satisfy and transcend the wide and ever-changing range of interior decor trends. They include delicate figuratives, bright modern abstracts, and even traditional and transitional landscapes.

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Lisa’s agent Brad Huff joined in on the fun as they toured the Third & Wall showroom and artwork.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then it was time for everyone to relax at a fun and casual lunch around our conference table. Those of the 3&W team that hadn’t met Lisa and Penny yet had a great time getting to know them.

Lisa Ridgers with some of the 3&W team

Lisa Ridgers with some of the 3&W team

A BIG thank you to Lisa and Penny for crossing the pond to come visit us and meet the team!

From the Studio of Pablo Rojero

Artist Pablo Rojero’s work graces interiors all over the world, and it’s easy to see why. His captivating style is apparent whether he’s working on abstracts, cityscapes, landscapes or figuratives. Not only is Pablo an accomplished artist, he’s also a delightfully warm and open individual, an engaging conversationalist, and is dedicated to his family and his work. Versatile and energetic, he is always open to exploring new ideas and creative avenues.

Pablo Rojero

Pablo Rojero

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?
The first thing I do in the morning is take my twin sons to school. After that i usually have breakfast with my daughter.

How many images do you work on at a time?
I usually work on two to three; I lose focus if I put too many on the wall.

 

 

Rustic City

Rustic City

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?
My dream project would be to start an art program geared to help children with autism, as both my sons have autism.

If you could collaborate with anyone, who would it be?
I would have loved to paint with William Bouguereau, he was an amazing academic painter.

 

 

Pablo at work
What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?
I was taught by a mentor to look at my surroundings everywhere I go, to look at every detail, from texture on the street to how light affects objects. I constantly do this as it builds my repertoire of ideas.

How has your artwork evolved over time?
My art has become more free and balanced. I’ve learned when to stop and say “it’s done” as I used to overcook  the art.

What do you like most about your work?
I really like the layers on my art, I feel that it is a crucial process in my paintings. You’ve got to let the art breathe.

Del Mar, California

Del Mar, California

What is one word that best describes your style?
Spontaneous

Is there an idea you would like to explore?
I would like to explore figurative art a bit more.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?
I like 10:00 am. By then I’m fully recharged and ready to go.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?
I get stuck on pieces all the time, and when it happens I’ll just go back to something that worked in the past.
I sometimes play some guitar or hit the drums which shifts my thinking, it helps a lot.The artist's studio

What is up next on your easel?
I’m currently working on Neutral tone abstracts. I’m using silver and gold leaf as a new element in my work. I’m incorporating elements of texture that I observe in the environment, for example cement, the patina on antique furniture etc.

Pablo’s works are available for Print-On-Demand and licensing, and a selection of his images are available in our Original and Poster collections. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Camera Lens of Aaron Matheson

aaron matheson photography seattle photographerAaron Matheson fills a dual role at Third & Wall Art Group. He’s a versatile fine art photographer who recently signed on as a Third & Wall artist and has been very well-received by our customers; AND he is also a Third & Wall Production Specialist who applies his keen eye for color and amazing technical skills to creating final product for our Print-On-Demand, Photography and Poster programs. Aaron’s work shows his deep affinity for nature, travel and the outdoors, although he has proven himself to be a city-lover as well with his bold urban photography.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning? First thing in the morning I usually peruse social media with a heavy emphasis on Instagram. I love looking at other imagery, generally doing my own critique, creatively feeding off great images and getting new ideas. I then check my email and strap in for hours of Photoshop.

How many images do you work on at a time? When I get back to my studio from a shoot I download all images taken during the shoot, then narrow them down to either the best images or the images specified by the client. The amount of images to edit can range from my top 10 to my top 1,000 depending on the how many were shot. I batch process as many as I can, then edit the best one by one.

nature photography rocks cliffs rockclimbing

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Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on? There are multiple locations I would love to visit, but I am a rock climber at heart, so my dream project would be traveling, climbing and shooting images for an extended 6 month trip starting in Western Europe, traveling through China and ending in Australia.

photography black and white mountains landscape

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If you could collaborate with anyone, who would it be? I have always admired the work of Richard Avedon and his ability to capture raw emotion and tell a person’s story with a single portrait. I’d be crazy not to mention Ansel Adams as well. He probably did more for photography than any other single person in history. His ability to see light and understand the limitations of the camera, film and printing was incredible. Without Ansel Adam’s knowledge and talent I truly believe that photography wouldn’t be where it is today.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration? I am always looking at social media. There are so many incredible photographers out there constantly putting out new works, it’s really hard to not be inspired to get off the couch and do something. A lot of times I will see a photo or piece of art and I will push myself to try to do something similar only better.

photography coastal tropical island sunset palm trees

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How has your photography evolved over time? I started shooting black and white film and really shot to learn, not so much for art. Eventually I started shooting more people and some fashion. I went down the road of shooting everything in HDR digitally then moved away from that method, but  am now re-approaching it using different processes and editing styles. My preference was always to capture the entire scene before me, but recently I’ve started shooting more close-ups and doing more macro photography to explore small details that are often overlooked.

What do you like most about your work? I love that I can go anywhere with my camera and shoot photos. I also love that I can constantly learn and develop new styles and techniques to make me a better and more well-rounded photographer.

What is one word that best describes your style?  Colorful.

Is there an idea you would like to explore?  I’m always open to new ideas, but currently I have an idea for a floral series that I hope to start working on later this summer or early fall.

What is your favorite time of day to shoot?  I love getting out and being set up an hour before sunrise and sunset. The light in the mornings and evenings is always great.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do? I definitely get stuck from time to time. I generally get stuck when I have a very particular idea and I can’t make it happen for any number of reasons – location, atmosphere, lighting, equipment, etc.

What is up next on your photo shoot roster? I don’t really know. I have a few trips planned for this year and I plan on going into the mountains as much as possible in between. Only time will tell what comes up next…

Aaron Matheson’s image collection can be viewed in the Photography section of our website. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

 

From the Studio of Terri Burris

FullSizeRender[2]Artist Terri Burris Intertwines her love of nature, abstraction and design in each of her atmospheric pieces. She paints intuitively, creating her transitional abstracts, landscapes, florals and urban works from focused perspectives of the natural world. Her palettes emerge directly from her intimate observations of life’s minute details.

transitional floral, seattle art, terri burris

African Tulip

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning? The first thing I do when I go into my studio is put on music. Music is such a big part of my process. It depends what mood I’m in, but I love to listen to either jazz, classical, or alternative. Once my music is set, I enter into the zone and start painting for as long as I can.

What do you like most about your work? What I like most about my work is that I don’t plan anything before I start, I work very intuitively. I love the idea that something is working through me when I paint, surrendering to the process.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do? When I get stuck on a painting, I find I need to leave it alone for a while, detach from it physically and emotionally. At that point I usually start on a new canvas, painting fast and loose for a few minutes …then maybe clean my studio or pull weeds from my garden.

santa monica, palm trees, seattle art

Santa Monica

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?  If I could paint with anyone, it would be one of the master painters from the Abstract Expressionist era. I am especially inspired by the work of Richard Diebenkorn, Helen Frankenthraler and Lee Krasner.

How many paintings do you work on at a time?  I generally work on 3 paintings at a time in various stages of progress.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration?  I generate a lot of inspiration and ideas from the many museums and galleries I’m fortunate enough to have in my Los Angeles neighborhood. Another major source of inspiration for me is just being in nature.

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Polka-Dot Bikini

What is your favorite time of day to paint? My favorite time of day to paint is early in the morning with a gigantic cup of steaming hot coffee.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on? My dream project is any time I get to paint for a show or collaborate with a client one on one.

 What is up next on your easel? Right now I’m exploring pouring paint and working with watercolor washes.

 

Terri’s images can be viewed in the Posters, Print-On-Demand and Originals sections of our website. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

 

 

From the Studio of Kelsey Hochstatter

Unknown-5From graceful abstracts to haunting figuratives, whimsical children’s images to  transitional landscapes, Kelsey Hochstatter’s artwork claims both masculine and feminine appeal, making it ideal for (and very popular in) all interiors, whether corporate, residential, hospitality or healthcare. And her style is always uniquely Kelsey!

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?  Dive right in!

How many paintings do you work on at a time? Sometimes only one, sometimes a few. If I’m doing a series of panels, or small pieces that work as a group, I work on them together bouncing from one to another and progressing from sketching to painting to collage.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on? I would love to work on an extremely large-scale mixed-media piece. Something that takes at least a year to complete and requires scaffolding and my climbing gear to reach the top.

OHOC-247If you could paint with anyone, who would it be? Amongst others, I would love to paint with, and glean from, Anselm Kiefer.

What’s your favorite way of generating ideas and inspiration? There are so many ways. One of my favorites is walking through a vintage flea market with my husband, digging through memories, realizing nostalgia in entirely new ways. I gain a lot from this. My neighbor recently gave me piles of vintage ephemera for my studio. Every single piece had meaning. Someone had saved each item for some reason meaningful to them. I love having this stuff at my fingertips. I can give it new life; freeze it in time.UHOC-206

How has your art evolved over time? As a child I sketched often. When I started painting seriously in college I was focusing on painting and printmaking. My paintings were originally strictly paintings. Just paint. I started experimenting with mixed media around ’06. Still, more paint than not. Since then I’ve noticed more and more collage has come into my work. The work I’ve really planted roots in and am most passionate about involves sketching, painting and vintage ephemera collage. When I can exercise various techniques and create a piece that truly ‘works’ while doing so, I’m happy.

What do you like most about your work? The attempt at nostalgia.

UHOC-314What is one word that best describes your style?  Nostalgic.

Is there an idea you would like to explore? I am intrigued by how much texture could be used in order to gain more and more interest and depth while still maintaining 2-dimensionality.

What is your favorite time of day to paint? Late afternoon/ early evening. I’m a night owl who OHOC-222loves to paint until my eyes go blurry, but I find that I am most energized and in a groove during those hours.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do? Sometimes. When I’m stubborn and try to work through it I usually just prolong finding the answer. Stepping away often helps, but leaving the studio is hard. Asking my 3 year old son what he thinks can also shed some light on the situation. Toddlers have a nice way of seeing the world, and art.

 What is up next on your easel? A new series involving figures, layered numbers, and vintage ephemera.

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Kelsey’s intriguing images can be viewed in the Posters, Print-On-Demand and Originals sections of our website. Some areas of our website are password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From the Studio of Keith Morgan, Seattle Photographer

IMG_6881With his unique eye for composition and color, photographer Keith Morgan shares his view of our world in a way that evokes longing for places we haven’t visited, and awe for the exquisite beauty of nature.

What do you first do when you get to your desk in the morning?
Check emails, browse Facebook, check my calendar.

photography, seattle art, seattle photographer, florals, flowers, nature, botanical

“9 Square 2”

How many images do you work on at a time?
In the field, I shoot multiple shots from many angles and perspectives. At my desk, once I’ve narrowed down the image I want to process I work on it from start to finish.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?
Yes, Iceland @ summer solstice.

If you could shoot with anyone, who would it be?
Honestly, I prefer to be alone.

photography, seattle photographer, coastal, ocean, sea, sunrise, sunset, pacific northwest, washington

“KM2_5921”

 

Is there an idea you would like to explore?
I have a few self portrait ideas that I haven’t had time to try.

What is your favorite time of day to shoot?
Sunset, dusk.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?
Yes. I walk away for a half  hour or so.

photography, seattle photographer, landscape, black and white, mountains

“KM2_3141sep”

“My love of photography is something that has been a part of me for as long as I can remember.  I learn best through trial and error and have been completely self-taught through books and the internet. I love travel and landscape photography and am on the road taking pictures as often as I can.” ~ Keith Morgan

Keith’s gorgeous images can be viewed in the Print-On-Demand section of our website. This area of our website is password-protected. If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

 

From The Studio of Randy Hibberd

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Randy Hibberd is a genius at creating timelessly elegant, upscale contemporary artwork that integrates boldly and seamlessly into all types of commercial and residential interiors.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?
Coffee coffee coffee . . . and change into my painting clothes like Mr. Rogers.

How many paintings do you work on at a time?
I usually have 3-6 paintings going on at all times. You never know what mood you’ll be in when entering the studio walls; it’s fun to have options.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?
Solo show at the Guggenheim.

UnknownIf you could paint with anyone, who would it be?
I love to paint with my beautiful daughters Riley and Rachel . . . I could paint with them everyday!
 
Is there an idea you would like to explore?
I’m always fired up to explore new ideas , that’s the rush of painting – when you’re inspired and can’t wait to get to the studio.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?
2-6 pm. The coffee has fully kicked in, goofing off has subsided and the pressure is on to get something done for the day.

Unknown-1Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?
Getting “stuck” is normal practice in my abstract world . Sometimes it flows, sometimes it’s junk. Most times I battle through until I find a solution . . . just keep painting. But on rare occasions I just walk away and come back fresh the next day. This always yields a new perspective and a solution reveals itself .

What is up next on your easel?
Magazine pages. Tons of ever-evolving magazine photos.

 

Randy Hibberd’s original works, posters and print-on-demand imagery are available from Third & Wall Art Group. All images are © Randy Hibberd and published/distributed by Third & Wall Art Group.

If you are a member of the trade but don’t have full access to our website, www.thirdandwall.com, please contact us at customerservice@thirdandwall.com.

From The Studio of Jill Martin

jill martin studio_USEJill Martin’s ethereal imagery is bright and soft, glowing with clean hues and a dreamy appeal that few can resist.

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

Check my email, read some news, then spend some time cleaning up my painting table which I always leave messy from the day before.

 How many paintings do you work on at a time?

I’ll prep several canvases at once, but I tend to focus on just one or two paintings at a time.

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Merriment II

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

To paint 5 or 6 large paintings of different types of couples.

If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?

Very hard to choose. I could learn so much from Alex Kanevsky, Julie Heffernan, and Kent Williams.

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

How to paint the figure not in an impressionistic or gestural way but like a blurry photograph. – early Gerhard Richter’s work.

jillmartin landscapeptg_USEWhat is your favorite time of day to paint?

I’ll paint whenever, but the light in the studio is usually best midday and afternoon.

 Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?

Yes, I do get stuck sometimes and keep redoing areas over and over. At that point I have to not look at the painting for a few hours or a few days. Then when I go back to it I have a fresh perspective which hopefully makes it easier to see what needs to be done.

 What is up next on your easel?

A large abstracted landscape.

Jill Martin’s original works, posters, and print-on-demand imagery are available from Third & Wall Art Group. All images © Jill Martin and published/distributed by Third & Wall Art Group.

 

 

The Amazing Sarah Stockstill

SarahStockstillRAWMy love for Sarah Stockstill’s work began very shortly after I started to work for Third and Wall Art Group. I was still in training and had the opportunity to visit her in her studio as she was just starting a new piece. I had seen her work before in print form, which I really liked, but it wasn’t until I sat there in complete awe of her and her talent that I really did just fall in love.

She greeted me with a hug and a huge smile that just lit up the room. There is something so sweet and genuine about her, I felt at ease immediately. I had years of experience on the retail end dealing with published pieces, but I was a complete newbie when it came to the original art market. This was my first exposure to how an artist takes a blank canvas and starts to create.

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“Lyric in Gesture”

"Sonata II"

“Sonata II”

With fluid motions and various tools she combined colors in a way that to me seemed completely effortless. She layered and pulled paint over the canvas, then stepped back, tilted her head to both sides and continued. I was watching the colors she was using and thought “Mmmmm, that’s an interesting combination” – and just like that, the colors blended together, light variations of colors and the HUGE once-blank canvas evolved into a stunning abstract original.

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“Aquitaine II”

I couldn’t help but smile during the entire process that I was fortunate enough to witness first hand. I am not an artist by any means but I have been in the industry long enough to know when there is an artist who is truly remarkable and unique. To me, that is Sarah Stockstill.

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My very own Sarah Stockstill original!

Recently I fell in love with one of her pieces, an abstract figure, and am happy to say thanks to the gracious gesture of one of our other amazing artists, Liz Jardine, it is hanging in my living room and I get to smile now every day because of the piece, and Sarah’s incredible talent.

– Melissa Hesse, Third & Wall Account ManagerMelissa_bw

 

 

 

 

Keith Morgan, Photographer

I just spent a few days backpacking in the North Cascade Mountains in Washington state. And for me, my favorite part is always the incredible vistas. Maybe it’s because I’m a visual person; I just can’t get enough of the breathtaking landscape surrounding us. Photographer Keith Morgan is a local Seattleite who also enjoys being in the outdoors, so I always get very excited to see his latest photography.

These are some of my favorites.

No wonder so many of our clients use Keith’s imagery for their healthcare projects. There is something so soothing and healing in viewing nature.

~ by Aimee Clarke, Creative Director

Keith’s gorgeous images can be viewed in the Print-On-Demand section of our website. This area of our website is password-protected. If you do not have a log-in to our website, contact us to find out if you qualify! [contact-form subject='[Third %26amp; Wall news | inspiration’][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Website’ type=’url’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

Featured Artist: Lisa Ridgers

Artist Lisa Ridgers

Artist Lisa Ridgers

We see the paintings and we know the artist’s name, but we don’t know anything else about the person who created the art, how she works, or how she is inspired. We recently caught up with Lisa Ridgers in her studio to find out from the top-selling artist herself – how does she create all those gorgeous paintings?

What do you first do when you get to the studio in the morning?

Usually I crank some tunes and jiggle around a little bit to get warmed up, inspired and loosen my muscles

How many paintings do you work on at a time?

It varies but normally two or three.

Do you have a dream project that you would like to work on?

Yes, I would LOOOOVE to work on a piece for P!NK. Sounds a bit weird, I know, but I really admire her talent and her authenticity, the lady rocks!

RidgersStudio2If you could paint with anyone, who would it be?

Well, if I had powers of resurrection, definitely JMW Turner. One more just to be greedy……I would also love to paint with Sarah Stockstill, her work has always inspired me.

Is there an idea you would like to explore?

Yes, I currently am intrigued by all the digital work that artists are now doing and would like to learn some new skills, incorporating something along those lines into my work.

What is your favorite time of day to paint?

Morning……my brain fritzes out in the afternoons.

Do you ever get “stuck” on a piece? If so, what do you do?RidgersStudio

Yes, I sometimes used to fight pieces to the death but now I take a different approach. I turn them around and they face the wall until I am ready to work on that piece again…some sit for weeks at a time.

What is up next on your easel?

I am playing around with a new “urban” look but have to work out some kinks yet…should be a fun day 🙂

Lisa Ridger’s original works, posters and print-on-demand imagery are available from Third & Wall Art Group.